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10 African Inspired Speculative Fiction Books

10 African Inspired Speculative Fiction Books

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Wizard of the Crow
War Girls
Who Fears Death
Rosewater +6
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For some reason that is beyond my understanding, speculative fiction isn’t the type of literature that is readily associated with Black people more generally and Africans in particular. For many, the global success of the Black Panther movie heralded the rise of African speculative thought, and while a lot can be said about how far from the truth that is, we will not be focusing on that in this post.

For many, the global success of the Black Panther movie heralded the rise of African speculative thought, and while a lot can be said about how far from the truth that is, we will not be focusing on that in this post.

On the contrary, we would like to highlight contemporary works of speculative fiction that were inspired by African elements – language, culture, history, you name it. Although Black Panther did not originate the idea of African speculative thought, it would be absurd to deny the role that its success has played in increasing the demand for speculative media across the board – from books to comics to motion pictures.

Although Black Panther did not originate the idea of African speculative thought, it would be absurd to deny the role that its success has played in increasing the demand for speculative media across the board – from books to comics to motion pictures.

We initially wanted to make this post all about Africanfuturism, but then we realised that it would be dominated by one name, so we decided to opt for the more generic genre of speculative fiction. This means that our recommendations will include a blend of Science Fiction and Fantasy, Africanfuturist books and Afrofuturist ones, and hopefully something that will pique your interest in African speculative fiction.

We initially wanted to make this post all about Africanfuturism, but then we realised that it would be dominated by one name, so we decided to opt for the more generic genre of speculative fiction.

Although this post is somewhat similar to a previous post of ours, which highlighted books inspired by African Oral Traditions, it is also slightly different – since it is more genre-specific and more contemporary in makeup. Lastly, it has not gone unnoticed that this list is quite dominated by books inspired by West-African (and Nigerian to be more specific) elements, which is why (as usual) we would appreciate any pointers you may have towards books that are just as good but from other parts of the African continent.

[w]e hope you’ll appreciate these recommendations, and if you haven’t read all of them already, we hope you’ll get to read them at some point – hopefully soon.

With that said, we hope you’ll appreciate these recommendations, and if you haven’t read all of them already, we hope you’ll get to read them at some point – hopefully soon.

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